Past ISE shows: Videos

 

"Praising what is lost, makes the remembrance dear"
All's Well, Act v, Sc.3

 

 

IMPORTANT SPECIAL NOTE:

 

Creating documentation of theatre projects

- especially the type of mixed-media theatre dvds 

we aim to provide in some of these pages, 

can be quite an expensive proposition - - and were it not for voluntarism, 

an enterprise that would otherwise be far 

beyond the financial reach of our small nonprofit.

 

So: Note that the majority of our film footage, dvds, and video clips were produced entirely by volunteers, typically using amateur equipmentVolunteers had to navigate many challenges.  They had to maneuver on uneven ground in the dark, and in such as way as to not obstruct live audience views (for example, through bushes!).  Also, the outdoor setting inherently means there will be many insect or other ambient sounds and lighting and sound challenges.  

 

Additionally, those professionals such as Munoz Productions (Dave and Margie Munoz) and Northstar Photography (Bill Gentsch) and the many other pros who have donated professional services to us did so from the depths of their generosity- and tho their generosity was never on a shoestring, often the hard-cost budget they had to work with was.  

 

We are deeply grateful to all of these kind, community-minded folks for their assistance – and especially grateful to lead documentary volunteers such as Eric Bench and Ben Sheridan.  

 

So while in most cases you will nevertheless see EXCELLENT quality media material (– astonishingly so!) please be respectfully aware of these extenuating circumstances - -we humbly request your full forgiveness of the occasional flaw. 

 

Also note:

 

Due to the above challenges, transcribing show clips and even stills for the web can be very time and labor intensive.  The ISE will add new shows to our roster as we have the editing process completed and the material available.

 

So if you don’t yet see your favorite show, be patient – or call us to lend a volunteer hand, if you want to speed up the process!

 

SAMPLE VIDEO CLIPS

 

The Iowa Shakespeare Experience Work Samples

 

Video Clip Table of Contents:

 

Much Ado-Wop About Something

Simon Estes 2009

First Repertory Season with live music and dance

 

The Complete Works of William Shakespeare, Abridged

Simon Estes 2009

First Repertory Season with live music and dance

 

 

Taming of the Shrew

Salisbury House 2008

Found Space Theatre infused with live music and dance

 

Much Ado About Nothing

Salisbury House 2007

Found Space Theatre infused with live music and dance

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WATCHING THE CLIPS:

Video Clips will be most enjoyable when seen in context of the entire show.  See Show Synopses, below.  

Video links follow each show Synopsis.

 

 

REPERTORY SEASON: SHOW SYNOPSES

 

The Iowa Shakespeare Experience at Simon Estes Amphitheater:

 

Notes from the Artistic Director:

 

The two productions of our 2009 summer season—“The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (abridged)” and “Much Adoo Wop About Something”— could not be more different than one another.

 

But both shows- not to mention their range -represent a huge step for the Iowa Shakespeare Experience.

 

Through our selections we not only want to nurture the lovers of the Bard – and we will!- but also we want to reach out to new audiences. We know that for many people their introduction to Shakespeare has been simply that—an introduction. They were probably exposed to one or two of his works in high school and their relationship to the Bard has remained casual ever since. 

 

Oh, what they have missed! Shakespeare’s world is a portal to a world of beautiful language, the most challenging thinking, and a vast cavalcade of characters. Big or small, each character shines—and teaches a lesson of life—while playing his or her hour on the stage; 

 

So, how do we intend to attract new audiences? Let’s look at our two productions. 

 

“The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (abridged)” takes a contemporary and edgy--but loving--look at the works of the Bard. The play is an off-beat guide to Shakespeare’s greatest works. The language of this wildly funny comedy is smart…and it is the language of today’s average person. That is, it is the language of our audience; it serves to penetrate the seemingly impenetrable language of the Elizabethan era to help us all arrive at recognizable themes. 

 

And, hey, we all know at least one phrase from Shakespeare’s work. All of us—from our many walks of life—can come together and bask in the glow of shared knowledge. 

 

“Much Adoo Wop About Something” is another vehicle for attracting new audiences. As stated in the play itself, “Much Adoo Wop” offers Shakespeare in bite size morsels. It is a collection of scenes from several great Shakespearean comedies. It doesn’t overwhelm the novice, yet it provides enough substance from each play so that one can genuinely take from it a true Shakespeare experience. 

 

All while offering the aficionado some simply delicious – and seeexxxy – scenes beloved for all time.  That Bard was a sexy guy!

 

Because of course, we want to appeal to those who are avid fans of Shakespeare, too. After all, the mission of our company is to promote, preserve and present the Bard. In doing so we want to demonstrate the power and relevance of his stories, characters and themes. For example, in “Much Adoo Wop,” I have worked hard to preserve Shakespeare’s language and dramatic construction. Why try to perfect perfection?

 

But, I believe Shakespeare, the consummate showman and cosmic jester, would embrace innovation, too. For that reason, I have constructed a playful dramatic framework that brings out a fresh dimension in his comedies. I’ve added a touch of doo wop! It is amazing that the sentimentality, preoccupations with love, the hyperbole and, frankly, the sheer joy that can be found in doo wop songs mesh perfectly with the themes and words of Shakespeare.

 

So, our two shows are for everyone. And, continuing with that theme, we anticipate reaching out to young people in the coming year by forming a youth acting company. We want to train young actors in the art of Shakespearean performance. 

 

But of course, there’s more.  So in upcoming months, be sure look for information about the youth programs and other activities and theatrical productions by going to our web site: www.iowashakespeare.org.

 

I hope that you will not only enjoy tonight’s show, but that you will come to see our other offering. I promise that attending both of our shows will be richly rewarding for you. And think of it—it’s all FREE! 

 

By supporting Shakespeare with your attendance you are supporting a great cultural experience you deserve!

 

Lorenzo Sandoval

Artistic Director

Iowa Shakespeare Experience

 

REPERTORY SEASON: SHOW SYNOPSES FOR 

MUCH ADO-WOP ABOUT SOMETHING

 

The Iowa Shakespeare Experience at Simon Estes Amphitheater:

 

 

Much Ado-Wop About Something

By W. Shakespeare and L. Sandoval, MFA

 

SCENE LIST AND SYNOPSIS

 

Your guide to the show tonight is the immortal, magical Puck – a mischievous and knavish sprite of the forest – and all-round wild guy!

 

~ ACT I  ~

Twelfth Night

 

Malvolio – Steward in the household of Lady Olivia

Maria – Servant in the household of Lady Olivia

Olivia – A wealthy young woman

Feste – Lady Olivia’s fool

 

(Malvolio, a steward, is in love with his boss, Lady Olivia. His prickly personality rubs Maria, a lesser servant in the house, the wrong way—in fact, she is moved to revenge. Ain’t no one does revenge like Mariah does revenge! She writes a love letter that appears to be written by Lady Olivia. The letter causes Malvolio to think Lady Olivia is in love with him.  And oh, the fun that ensues!)

 

 

The Taming of the Shrew

 

Baptista Minola – Father of Katherine

Katherina – Oldest daughter of Baptista Minola (aka “The Shrew”)

Petruchio – A young gentleman of Verona, suitor to Katherina

 

(Baptista Minola has an older daughter, Katherina, whose shall-we-say abrasive personality makes her highly undesirable for marriage. Unfortunately, the youngest daughter, Bianca, cannot be married until her older sister is married first. Petruchio arrives in Padua and decides to woo Katherina—primarily because of her wealth. In one of the most famous scenes of Shakespeare, Petruchio and Katherina have a run-in and we’ll watch the sparks fly!.)

 

The Merry Wives of Windsor

 

Sir John Falstaff – A roguish, amorous knight

Pistol – Falstaff’s cohort

Mistress Page – A wealthy woman of Windsor

Mistress Ford – A wealthy woman of Windsor

John & Robert – Servants of Mistress Ford

Robin – A page to Falstaff

 

(Sir John Falstaff, a larger-than-life lover-of-life, means to seduce two wealthy women of Windsor: Mistresses Page and Ford. He is so confident in his skills of love and deception, that he sends a love letter to each woman that contains the same text—the names of the recipients are different, of course. The two women get wise to his deceit and mischief and set a trap to teach Falstaff a lesson.)

 

 

~ ACT II ~

 

The Merchant of Venice

 

Portia – A young wealthy woman

Nerissa – Portia’s lady-in-waiting

Suitors – Gentleman who seek Portia’s hand in marriage

 

(Portia complains to Nerissa that she is unhappy with the terms of her dead father’s will. Portia is to marry any suitor who finds her picture in one of three chests made of gold, silver and lead. Portia dislikes her suitors; she describes their horrible qualities in detail to Nerissa. Portia also reveals that she is attracted to a man named Bassanio. Hmmmm!)

 

As You Like It

 

Jaques – A perennially melancholy  nobleman

 

(This is a short scene which illustrates Jaques’ melancholy, and his affection for Shakespeare’s sonnets. He thinks the Bard’s sonnets convey messages of love better than Puck’s “doo wop” lyrics. They engage in a friendly competition – dueling Bard, anyone?)

 

 

Romeo and Juliet

 

Romeo – Does he really need a description?  

Juliet – Does she really need a description?

 

(It’s love at first sight for star-crossed lovers Romeo and Juliet, lovers who are within each of us.  Summer magic at its best!)

 

A Midsummer Night’s Dream

 

Quince – Director of the play-within-a-play

            Players in the play-within-a-play:

Wall

Pyramus

Thisby

Lion

Moonshine

 

(This is a hilarious play-within-a-play about the way in which a humble, bumbling troupe of Not-that-Good Actors, called to present to the King.  They present the tragedy that befalls Pyramus and Thisby. A misunderstanding involving a lion seals the fate of these two doomed lovers.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About Much Ado-Wop 

 

Music Directors Notes:  

 

Oil is to water as Shakespeare is to Doo-Wop.  At least that's what one would think upon first glance, thinking of the concept of a fusion between these two artistic languages.  

 

But I'm pleased to report that during my time spent in this production's development phase, I've been amazed to discover that Doo-Wop is actually a splendid means of communicating some of Shakespeare's best qualities: the spirit of creativity, the playfulness and whimsy, and the romantic lushness of emotion.  

 

This project came to me at a time when I’ve been a deeply involved member of our local arts scene for over 25 years.  So the time was right for me to infuse some freshness into my creative palette, rather than fall prey to the temptation of "resting on one's laurels." My personal learning curve was pretty high on both sides of this equation, and I'm emerging with much greater familiarity & appreciation of each part of the musical puzzle called "Much Ado-Wop...".   

 

I have emerged from this amazing creative process knowing that both the Shakespearean and Doo-Wop genres are in great need of being kept alive, and I'm delighted to lend my humble efforts to carry the torch for both in one fell swoop.  

 

In Shakesperience Fest 2009, you are seeing and hearing some of our city's most talented perfomers in both of these Festival shows, and it's been a joy to share the stage with them.  

 

So whether you're a "newbie" or seasoned fan of these artforms, I believe both shows are excellent choices to meet you exactly where you're at in your level of connaisseurship.  

 

I hope you will leave Shakesperience™ ’09 inspired and uplifted on multiple levels, and that you will make room in your personal artistic treasure chest for the beautiful "bella" soul of both Shakespeare and Doo-Wop from this time forth.

 

Peace, Tina Haase Findlay

 

 

Much Adoo-Wop About Something generated FIVE original songs! 

 

Song List

 

Act 1:

Shakin' The Shakespeare, @2009 kadobra music, words & music by Tina Haase Findlay 

The Wanderer, @1961 words & music by Ernie Maresca, #2 in U.S., made famous by Dion 

 

Crazy Little Love Thing--parts 1 & 2, @2009 kadobra music, words & music by Tina Haase Findlay 

 

Why Do Fools Fall In Love, @1956 words & music by Frankie Lymon & Morris Levy, #6 in U.S., made famous by Frankie Lymon & The Teenagers

 

Hell Hath No Fury, @2009 kadobra music, words & music by Tina Haase Findlay 

 

Calendar Girl, @1960 words by Howard Greenfield, music by Neil Sedaka, #4 in U.S., made famous by Neil Sedaka 

 

Act 2:

Chantilly Lace, @1958 Mercury Records, words & music by J.P. Richardson, #6 in U.S., made famous by The Big Bopper (J.P. Richardson)

 

The Birds And The Bees, @1964 words and music by "Barry Street", #3 in U.S., made famous by Jewel Akens

 

I Only Have Eyes For You, @1934 words by Al Dubin, music by Harry Warren, #11 in U.S., made famous by The Flamingos

 

In The Still Of The Night, @1956 words & music by Fred Parris, #24 in U.S., made famous by The Five Satins

 

Last Kiss, @1962 words & music by Wayne Cochran, #2 in U.S., made famous by J. Frank Wilson & The Cavaliers

 

Goodnight Sweetheart, @1953 words & music by Calvin Carter & James "Pookie" Hudson, #5 in U.S., made famous by The Spaniels

 

Shoop Shoop Shadows, @2009 kadobra music, words & music by Tina Haase Findlay 

 

We Go Together, @1971 words & music by Jim Jacobs & Warren Casey, from the stage in 1971, then #1 "Grease" soundtrack in 1978

 

Show open: Much A-DooWop About Something, @2009 kadobra music, words & music 

by Tina Haase Findlay

 

All songs arranged by Tina Haase Findlay,

 except "In The Still Of The Night" 

arranged by Amy Burgmaier

 

MUCH ADO-WOP ABOUT SOMETHING  (Simon Estes)

VIDEO CLIP TABLE OF CONTENTS:  Locating and comprehending Tracts

(List of Clips coming soon)

 

WHEN LINK IS AVAILABLE, CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE SPECIFIC TRACTS  LISTED ABOVE:    X

 

 

REPERTORY SEASON: SHOW SYNOPSES FOR 

THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, ABRIDGED

The Iowa Shakespeare Experience at Simon Estes Amphitheater:

 

About Abridged:

 

“Not your grandparent’s Bard!”

 

“The Complete Works of William Shakespeare, Abridged” is one of the most produced plays in the entire world.  

 

The play was born of the most famous Fringe Festival in the world, the lauded Edinburgh Fringe, granddaddy to all Fringe Festivals.  

 

The play went on to become one of London’s longest running comedies.

 

It has been seen in virtually every country around The Globe.

 

Currently in revival at Shakespeare Festivals on both coasts, in 2009 the play was brought back to New York City area Shakespeare Festivals by popular demand.  The Iowa Shakespeare Experience is proud to bring this unique version of the play- featuring our hallmark surprise twists and turns – to Des Moines audiences

 

Wild, wacky, winsome, and dear, holding multiple surprises, the play manages to both spoof the Bard as well as revere him.  Newcomers and aficionados alike will find themselves engaged by what critics term “intellectual vaudeville” at its finest.  

 

If you’ve never seen this show, you owe it to yourself to give it a whirl. And if you’ve relished it before, we promise you a Complete Works like none you’ve ever before seen!

 

 

MUCH ADO-WOP ABOUT SOMETHING  (Simon Estes)

VIDEO CLIP TABLE OF CONTENTS:  Locating and comprehending Tracts

(List of Clips coming soon)

 

WHEN LINK IS AVAILABLE, CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE SPECIFIC TRACTS  LISTED ABOVE:    X

 

TAMING OF THE SHREW: SHOW SYNOPSIS

 

The Iowa Shakespeare Experience at Salisbury House:

 

ARTISTIC DIRECTION: An example of meeting the challenges of “Found Space” theatre

 

Salisbury House is a 1920s architectural construction -  an Historic House Museum  that is a nice location for Shakespeare- but a location lacking various normal accoutrements of theatre, such as a back stage and wing area, certain lighting and sound abilities, and a traditional audience seating area  In particular, producing theatre at this site involved the use of an underground tunnel so that the Actors could move about backstage out of view of the audience- however, the tunnel took some time to traverse, making costume and scene changes sometimes require a bit more time to effect than would be usual. 

  •  The space also presented various challenges in terms of orienting the show to the audience for maximum sightlines.  We use an unusual but effective configuration where Actors treat the stage as if it were a 180 Degree “half round”, although the stage area itself is square. This means the play is performed on a diagonal. (Those viewing the DVD should note that audience is arranged on essentially 3 sides, although the dvd is able to capture one particular viewing angle at a time, and often one far off center. .Keep in mind that at all times, the audience can see far more than the DVD can show.)

 

As a theatre non-profit which specializes in presenting what’s known as “Found Space” theatre (theatre presented in non-traditional spaces as they are “found”)  the ISE helps fellow non-profits extend their mission to new audiences.  So The Iowa Shakespeare Experience is undaunted by such challenges.  Instead- we thrive!

 

This series of clips shows our creativity and our truly artisan approach to handling challenges such as managing timely costume and scene changes made difficult by terrain difficult to maneuver in. The clips demonstrate our genuine expertise with implementing “Found Space” theatre and also (as you will see below) our significant expertise in providing scholarly interpretations of Shakespeare that simultaneously draw in the modern audience or Shakespeare newcomers.  

 

The viewer will note that a particular challenge of our productions at Salisbury involved building the Shakespeare program there from ground zero- after a general absence of Shakespeare from the area for nigh unto a decade.  This meant that our productions were carefully crafted to delight the Shakespeare aficionado with dramaturgical excellence- while at the same time, designed to systematically nurture and grow an audience relatively new to the Bard.  

 

Our phenomenal success in this regard is evidenced by the fact that starting with an audience of zero, we grew to audiences of over 1000 in merely three years. 

 

MAKING SENSE OF THE CLIPS:

 

Taming of the Shrew: Basic Plot Overview:

 

In the main storyline of Shakespeare’s famous comedy, an older sister, Kathryn (or Kate) quite headstrong, must be married before the younger, docile sister Bianca can be married.  A carefree bachelor, Petrouchio, vows to woo the heavily doweried Kate, while Bianca has many suitors.  Their parent, in our version mother Donya Baptista Manola, tries to orchestrate the many intricacies. 

 

This story contains much material that rightfully troubles feminists, but at the same time, the story provides some of Shakespeare’s most famous comedic moments.  In the end, Kate may have the last laugh, as she manages to both seduce her husband into believing she now lives to perform his wishes- while they both may be surprised that along the way, in our interpretation, they actually fall deeply into true love.  

 

As is typical with Shakespeare, a variety of other plots interweave with the main storyline. 

 

Shakespeare set his play in Italy, and In our version of the story, we set the plot during early 1700s Italy, a time suited to the architecture of courtyards -and particularly suited to masked balls. 

 

This setting allows us our creative and innovative treatment of one unique and particular challenge to this particular Shakespearean play- Shakespeare’s odd introduction.  Known as The Induction (similar to a story preface), this particular induction is so difficult for many Directors to deal with that this part of Shakespeare’s original work is often entirely left out of the presentation of the play. Therefore, many contemporary audiences are completely unaware that the story of the Taming of the Shrew is actually a “play within a play” – a device which may have much bearing on the apparent misogyny of the story.  In our insightful version of “Shrew”, we do present the induction – and thereby present the show as Shakespeare himself did.  However, unlike Shakespeare, we carry the story of the induction throughout the show, so that the audience is spared the odd sensation of an induction that goes nowhere (an issue with Shakespeare’s induction as written). It is this type of innovative, scholarly (yet highly creative) partnership with the Bard which makes the work of The Iowa Shakespeare Experience unique.  See more about the matter of the induction, below. 

 

How we handle Shakespeare’s special “Induction”: to Shrew: 

The Conceit of the New York City Nightclub (our Induction)

 

Shakespeare’s main character in the induction is a man called Christopher Sly, a stock character of a drunken man.  (Hence, our “Sly Stallone”).  Simiarly to our induction, Shakespeare’s is set in a bar (tavern) and involves antics where Nobles try to trick him during a drunken stupor.  The Nobles make sport of having Sly treated as a nobleman himself, and stage a play (the Shrew story) for Sly’s amusement- and very occaisionally, Sly re-appears in the main part of the Shrew storyline.

 

Thus, in our induction, our stock character (a1960s Lounge Lizard) is both treated deferentially by his associates as well as tricked by them, while the play is staged for the amusment of the patrons in the nightclub.  Mama’s Italian heritage traverses both worlds.

 

So in our induction, our “Sly” Stallone breaks down the fourth wall between the theatre and the audience and engages the audience in being part of the show – the audience is treated as diners and patrons of the vintage 1960s Italian restaurant and bar.  

 

In these ways, for the sophisticated Shakesperean scholar, our induction and the antics which occur in the Induction storyline can be a delicious play on Shakespeare’s original work – setting up the entire concept of the play-within-a-play and allowing all of us to reflect on the various types of meaning one might find in the Taming of the Shrew story- a story that IS merely a story, after all.  On the other hand, for the newcomer to the Bard, our treatment of the induction genuinely helps those new to Shakespeare follow what at times is a complex, multi-faceted story line.  

 

This example of simultaneous outcomes suited to all levels of audience expertise with Shakespeare is a hallmark of the tight interpretive and professional dramaturgical work of The Iowa Shakespeare Experience.  Or as one audience member who regularly attends professional Shakespeare all over the county put it in written feedback: “Brilliant!” 

 

TAMING OF THE SHREW CAST AND CREW LIST (Salisbury House)

 

ALL SHREW-STORYLINE SCENES TAKE PLACE IN THE 1920s, 

in the Courtyard of a palatial home somewhere n the Midwest, 

during 3 days at the height of midsummer..

 

ARTISTIC LEADERSHIP, CAST AND KEY CREW:

 

Artistic Director (Dramaturgy, Interpretation, infusion of multi-disciplinary elements): Lorenzo Sandoval, MFA

Play Adaptation: Lorenzo Sandoval, MFA

Director: Lorenzo Sandoval, MFA

Technical Director (Setting, Props, Costume Vision, Lighting Design, Set Transitions): Robin Heinemann

 

Producers:  Robin Heinemann and Lorenzo Sandoval, MFA

 

Choreographer: Jenn Miller

Musical Director:  Dwight Deason

Costumes: Mel Ziegenfuss and Abigail Livingood

Sound and Light Master: Jake Hines

Stage Manager: Larry Rife

 

CAST: 

 

Eric Bench (Grumio, Petrouchio’s servant)

A. Fogg (Night Visitor, a night visitor) 

Joseph Gentzler (Gremio, Suitor to Bianca)

Kim Grimaldi (Donya Baptista Manola, mother of Kate and Bianca, and Mama Stallone)

David Oddy (Petruchio, Kate’s suitor, and Stallone relative)

Jenn Miller (Widow, Tailor, Debbie)

Suzie Pratt (Katherine, the “Shrew”, and Stallone relative)

Lorenzo Sandoval Christopher Sly Stallone, Host

Benjamin Sheridan (Lucentio, pretends to one of Bianca’s tutors, and Stallone suitor)

Jolene Rice (Biondello, a servant to Lucentiio

Kt Marie Scarcello (Bianca, Kate’s sister, and Stallone relative)

Jennifer Wood  Elizabeth Cameron understudy (on camera) (Tranio, Lucentio’s sister, masquerades as male)

John Zickefoose (Hortensio, masquerades as a Tutor to woo Bianca, and Stallone relative)

Waitress (Helen Van Dam)

 

 

Band:  

Musical Director: Dwight Deason: The Hot Club of Des Moines

 

 

 

 

 

TAMING OF THE SHREW (Salisbury House)

DVD TABLE OF CONTENTS:  Locating and comprehending Tracts

 

 

 

CONTENT

DEMONSTRATES

DESCRIPTION  AND PLOT

MINUTES

(Approx.)

1

Pre-show entertainment:

Volare

Music

Audience warm up- setting the stage

1

2

Show set-up and announcement of a stand in

Theatre competencies

Showing off our abilities to deal with the unexpected as a natural part of theatre, this production managed

 the illness of a lead character with style, aplomb and grace.  In this production, Trania is a female character, 

played by a stand in on book. 

2

3

Induction (Preface) 

Shakespeare’s Induction: 

Christopher Sly

(And announcement of stand in)

(Includes 

That’s Amore)

Artistic Direction

In the original Shakespeare, Taming of the Shrew is actually a “play within a play”, set up by a preface 

or “induction”. Our induction provides delicious “in-jokes” for the Shakespeare aficionado (especially the play 

on Sly’s name and the deliberate invocation of a stock character in a bar setting) –while simultaneously 

setting the stage for later touchstones that can serve as “re-entry engagement  points

” that retain the newcomer’s involvement in the story- encouraging newcomers in fostering 

the appropriate spirit of play. 

In Shakespeare’s induction, Noblemen play tricks on a common tavern man. 

Thus, in our induction,  the stock 1960s Lounge Lizard gets tricked by his associates, while the play is staged 

for the amusement of the patrons in the nightclub (the audience).   Mama’s Italian heritage traverses the 

world of the induction back into more classic Renaissance Italy, where, for the purists- the bulk of the story

 (the play within the play) is set.  Italy was the location where Shakespeare set his own Shrew story. 

Or, as Sly would say, in his hallmark ham-handed way  - - the audience gets to time travel- - - 

back through the mists of time!

14

4

The Plot Set Up and Basics

.  

A classic scene

 

Also shows our skill in working with the unexpected- an Actor’s illness caused a stand-in to have to go on at last minute; she is on book

 

3

5

Bringing the Audience Back from Intermission One

Production Values

 

4

6

Bringing the Audience Back from Intermission Two: Fever 

 

PLUS

 

 Act II intro: 

Disguises are revealed

  •  Artistic Direction, 
  •  High production values,
  •  Meeting Found Space theatre challenges

At Sly’s restaurant, shy Debbie sees a chance to grab the spotlight.  

 

When Act II opens, one of Bianca’s Tutor reveals he has been in disguise so as to have been close to her, 

his love- but he is forced to see she loves another Tutor.

7

7

SCENE CHANGE:

At Petrouchio’s home

A classic scene

Petrouchio brings Kate to his home, where after a long trip, he plays mind games around her hunger and

 her desire for a pretty dress

7

8

At Petrouchio’s home Part II

Classic scene continues

(Continued from above)

7

9

Bella Note

(An example of how we handled building in time for Costume Changes)

Meeting Found Space theatre challenges

At Sly’s nightclub, in a scene deliberately designed to call to mind another famous Italian scene involving

 a plate of spaghetti, Mama Stallone gives the budding romance between their daughter and future 

son in law a little push – with a song from the Old Country.  

2

10

Plot Solutions

Classic scenes

Some of the dialogue in these scenes is considered to be among Shakespeare’s 

most successful comedic writing

3

11

Plot Solutions

Classic scenes

 

 

12

Scene change to Wedding Banquet

High production Values

The family gathers at a wedding feast to celebrate 3 marriages- the Tutors plus the marriages of Mama’s two daughters.  

1.30

13

Kate’s famous Monologue – Kate and Petrouchio are in love

Monologue

The clip begins with Donya Manola and the group wagering Petrouchio that Kate has really not been “tamed”.  Petrouchio takes the bet.  Kate makes her answer in one of the play’s famous Monologues which shows Shakespeare’s view of men and women.  

4

 

 

 

IMMEDIATE SEGUEWAY INTO DANCE SEQUENCE

 

14

Bergemask One:

Old Tarantella

 

(In Shakespeare’s time, plays were almost always ended with a Bergemask – a dance.)

Dance

(Choreography of NON-dancer Actors)

Our research which backed the Tarantella Music and Choreography sequence showed that there 

were two versions of the Tarantella: the traditional version that would have been danced at the time

 the main story was set in Italy, and a newer version which would have been danced at the time when

Sly’s nightclub was open in 1960s New York.  This interesting twist of historic fact allowed us to 

offer the audience two versions of both the dance and the music of this famed traditional ritual. 

1

15

Bergamask Two

New Tarantella

Dance

(Choreography of NON-dancer Actors)

See above.

2

16

Finale

 

 

1

17

Audience Exit and comments

 

 

1

 

 

 

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MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING: SHOW SYNOPSIS

The Iowa Shakespeare Experience at Salisbury House

 

ARTISTIC DIRECTION: An Example of Found Space Theatre

 

Salisbury House is a 1920s architectural construction -  an Historic House Museum  that is a nice location for Shakespeare- but a location lacking various normal accoutrements of theatre, such as a back stage and wing area, certain lighting and sound abilities, and a traditional audience seating area  In particular, producing theatre at this site involved the use of an underground tunnel so that the Actors could move about backstage out of view of the audience- however, the tunnel took some time to traverse, making costume and scene changes sometimes require a bit more time to effect than would be usual. 

  •  The space also presented various challenges in terms of orienting the show to the audience for maximum sightlines.  We use an unusual but effective configuration where Actors treat the stage as if it were a 180 Degree “half round”, although the stage area itself is square. This means the play is performed on a diagonal. (Those viewing the DVD should note that audience is arranged on essentially 3 sides, although the dvd is able to capture one particular viewing angle at a time, and often one far off center. .Keep in mind that at all times, the audience can see far more than the DVD can show.)

 

As a theatre non-profit which specializes in presenting what’s known as “Found Space” theatre (theatre presented in non-traditional spaces as they are “found”)  the ISE helps fellow non-profits extend their mission to new audiences.  So The Iowa Shakespeare Experience is undaunted by such challenges.  Instead- we thrive!

 

This series of clips shows our creativity and our truly artisan approach to handling challenges such as managing timely costume and scene changes made difficult by terrain difficult to maneuver in. The clips demonstrate our genuine expertise with implementing “Found Space” theatre and also (as you will see below) our significant expertise in providing scholarly interpretations of Shakespeare that simultaneously draw in the modern audience or Shakespeare newcomers.  

 

The viewer will note that a particular challenge of our productions at Salisbury involved building the Shakespeare program there from ground zero- after a general absence of Shakespeare from the area for nigh unto a decade.  This meant that our productions were carefully crafted to delight the Shakespeare aficionado with dramaturgical excellence- while at the same time, designed to systematically nurture and grow an audience relatively new to the Bard.  

 

Our phenomenal success in this regard is evidenced by the fact that starting with an audience of zero, we grew to audiences of over 1000 in merely three years. 

 

 

Examples of the infusion of music and dance 

MAKING SENSE OF THE CLIPS

Much Ado About Nothing: Basic Plot Overview:

 

In the main storyline of Shakespeare’s famous comedy, a smart and sophisticated young woman, Beatrice, meets her match with the charming Benedict. Both have been “confirmed bachelors” but both wind up quite surprised by falling in love with each other- tho certainly neither wants to be the first to actually admit their love!  This story takes a good deal of the possible misogyny of “Taming of the Shrew” and turns it on its ear! 

 

As is typical with Shakespeare, several other sub-plots interweave into the main storyline.  One additional plotline involves the famed Villain Don Juan – a villain who is simply that: a villain- he designed mischievous tricks and attempts to disrupt the course of true love for no other reason that to be villainous.  Another plotline involves the story of Constable Dogberry, a humble law enforcement officer who Shakespeare designed as over the top comic relief.  In our version of the Dogberry story, Dogberry is a female, obviously pregnant constable- providing delicious humorous moments with the same type of base humor as Shakespeare crafted- while at the same time, foreshadowing the way in which due to the suffrage movement of the 1920s, women would soon indeed become fully able to assume a role of a lead police officer or any other role.  And again as usual with Shakespeare, all of the plots are furthered by mistaken identities (aided and abetted by the goings on at the masked ball) as well the humorous plot devices of obvious eavesdropping.  

 

In a way startling to modern audiences, Shakespeare’s plays often juxtapose ribald humor, graphic sexuality, and deepest human drama and pathos close together – the “mood” and dramatic “style” of his works often changes quickly.  Thus, the view should note that the way in which this story moves abruptly from the comedic to the tragic is part of its original design.  Because in juxtaposition to the delicious light comedy described above, in this story, a more serious plotline also emerges in the intersection of all this comedy  The villain Don Juan sets into play Shakespeare’s famous plot device of mistaken identities- with truly tragic results.  Beatrice’s cousin? Hero, who has also fallen in love and is preparing to marry, is framed by Don Juan who perhaps resents her happiness.  Don Juan sets it up so that she appears to be meeting a man at her window late at night in compromising circumstance.  All untrue, but so scandalous that Hero’s fiancé Claudio refuses to marry her, and Hero apparently dies of grief (or is otherwise be spirited away by her family), who also turns on her in grief, horror and anger.  But Beatrice is outraged by how wronged her cousin is.  

 

How we handle the setting:

 

Shakespeare’s plays were in his day, modern contemporary stories which Shakespeare himself often placed in another historical time, such as in early Greece.  Today, Shakespeare’s own tradition continues as his plays are often set in a wide variety of historical times pre-dating or post-dating the Renaissance.  Because this production involves working with a1920s historic house museum to extend its mission, our production deliberately sets our version of the story in the 1920s, and the story of Much Ado was deliberately selected because in many ways, Much Ado correlates closely with the “new” (modern) view of women which in America, arose with 1920s suffragettes. 

 

However, our version of this story takes time travel one step further, again quite deliberately.  Because the viewer will note although built in the 1920s, this historic house was built as a replica of Tudor architecture which lends itself to Renaissance times. Thus, the audience at the play is invited to time travel during the play much as they do when touring the house:  In our 1920s story, we posit that the Masked Ball prominent in Shakespeare’s tale is a Masked Renaissance Ball.  This allows the characters to at one point, assume full Renaissance dress as they dress for the Ball- and gradually shed their party dress as the night wears on- allowing the audience a delicious sense of time travel between various eras – so that our version of the play truly showcases the personality of the house.  After all, part of the keen challenge and art of Found Space Theatre is allowing the theatre to be informed by the space – and we believe that we meet this challenge most creatively and with extraordinary integrity in this production.  All of this is foreshadowed when the costume rack is rolled out as a natural part of the character’s preparations for either the Costume ball or the wedding which follows it, allowing the audience to be in on the all the many layers of the tale.   

 

Thus, in deliberately playful manner, we mix and blur the sense of time – and as time passes and the night deepens (as  first light mist, then heavy fog fills the night air), we encourage the audience to move seamlessly from Shakespeare’s own Renaissance era back and forth into the era in which the historic house was built.  Rather than ham-handedly simply slapping “Shakespeare” onto this unique setting, we create a deliberate multidisciplinary, multi-sensual broad feast- using color, excellent dramaturgical research and top production values (including costuming, original dance and period-researched music) to under gird our high-end production of this classic tale with truly artistic, truly excellent production choices.  

 

Production  Notes from the Playbill:  Much Ado About Nothing  (Salisbury House)

(By Lorenzo Sandoval)

 

Set against the Roaring Twenties era when Salisbury House itself was built, and when women won both the vote as well as their first taste of liberation, this is—not at all coincidentally—a comedy about one of Shakespeare’s most liberated woman.  “Free-thinking” women! Watch the sparks fly, right along with the flapper’s fringe! 

 

The classic scenes between Beatrice and Benedick are some of the most realistic, fiery dialogues in all of Shakespeare. It is a glorious, complex, mysterious tango of love, pain, and deception. This spectacular, multi-layered, passionate portrayal of the war between the sexes is then played to great comedic effect against the terrific villainy of Don John. He is simply bad, bad, bad to the bone--and bad for no particular reason other than the sheer joy of it!   He’s the spitting image of the guy you love to hate.

 

Tonight’s presentation of Shakespeare’s favorite dramaturgical devices—elaborate gambits and mistaken identity- offers audiences the best of two worlds. Torn between a love of the classic and a yen for the new? Tonight, we’ll meet both your demands.  A fresh interpretation of the Bard’s classic is, in our production, paired with a scene or two set in traditional Renaissance splendor!  The elegant, Gatsby-esque occupants of our grand Midwestern manor are hosting a Renaissance-themed Costume Ball.  Enjoy the sense of time travel as, along the way,  you are treated to genuine, historically accurate songs of the Jazz Age, performed by the Ballyhoo Foxtrot Orchestra as well as the dazzling Tango of Argentina’s Karina Barone.

 

The story line?  We took a few liberties with it, but it is very simple: comedy paired with high drama.  Plots are hatched, more plots are hatched, yet more plots are hatched, divergent plots unite in a sword fight, tragedy ensues, inanity ensues, trees move, and everybody gets married – or not - to the right person – or not.  But, thank heaven, a Fargo-esque pregnant Constable – well, why not?-- makes sure it all stays within the law.  

 

As Bibliomania puts it: “The play is best known and best appreciated for its comic wordplay, unmaskings and minor characters”… the actual plot is incidental.  

 

In closing, Sylven Barret of Tufts University notes that “newcomers to the Bard are apt to inquire:  ‘Why don’t they just do “authentic” Shakespeare, “straight” Shakespeare, the play as Shakespeare wrote it?’ Barret continues: “But, as we read the plays- words written to be performed – it sometimes becomes clear that we do not know how to perform them. The plays are filed with lines that call for gestures- but we are not sure what the gestures should be.  In Shakespeare, ‘interpretation’ is inevitable.  Inevitably our productions are our adaptations.  It is a truism that every age invents its own Shakespeare.”

 

Barret concludes with the following thought about Shakespeare plays.  They are “so cunningly contrived that they guide our responses, tell us how we ought to feel, make a mark on us, but … we also make a mark on them.”

 

So relax, and enjoy.  Let the play make its mark on you- and go ahead and add your mark of imagination to it.  Tonight you are joining a tradition in which thousands upon thousands of revelers all across the world partake- that time honored tradition of “Shakespeare under the stars” – when fine culture, fine friends, fine wine, fine picnics, fine gardens, and the finest elements of nature blend together in joyous abandon.  Settle back – and enjoy the show!

 

 

 

ACT BY ACT SUMMARY:  MUCH ADO ABOUT SOMETHING (Salisbury House)

 

The entire play takes place in the 1920s in the courtyard of a palatial home, somewhere in the Midwest, during the night before and the day of midsummer, and the day that follows. The play will be performed in two acts, with a 15 minute intermission.  

 

Act I: Don Pedro, the Ambassador of Mexico, Don John, his troublesome brother, and Claudio and Benedick, two friends and military associates of Don Pedro, are returning to the Midwest from the recent Mexican skirmishes (see historical notes.). They arrive for a visit at the palatial Midwestern home of their old friends, Leonata and Don Antonio, brother and sister.  Living in Leonata’s household is her daughter, Hero, and her strong willed niece, Beatrice.  Poor relations Ursula and Margaret have been sent by their families to be helpers to the wealthy Leonata, and have become companions to Hero, despite Margaret’s penchant for the Southern Comfort in her ever-present flask, a tribute to her southern roots.  Young Bathasar, a very distant cousin, also helps the household as a jack-of-all trades. 

 

What luck!  The travelers have chanced to arrive at teatime on the day the family is planning to host a Renaissance Costume Ball to celebrate midsummer’s eve.  The travelers are invited to stay for the Ball that night.  The household is in a delightful state of anticipation for the Ball.  Eccentric brother Don Antonio is having the time of his life, overseeing the decorations and plans for the great party.  Don Antonio sees to it that the travelers are provided with wonderful Renaissance costumes, although the only costume left for Don John is a ridiculous Jester suit, which Don John reluctantly and ruefully wears.  His innate desire to cause serious mischief grows.  Borrachio and Conrade, old friends and henchman of Don John, who have also arrived for the Ball, help fuel Don John’s desire to plot trouble.

 

At the Ball, guests finish donning their Renaissance duds.  Some of the guests have gone all out and arrive in full Renaissance attire, although there is big trunk of Renaissance hats and boas out for those who need a little prodding to get in the mood.  One of the arriving guests is an elegant lady who eventually steals the spotlight from the other women with her sizzling Tango, the popular dance of the times.  Under her spell in the sultry night air, the magic of the Tango momentarily transforms even wacky Don Antonio into an ardent Latin lover.  

 

Although all too soon the lovely Tango dancer must leave the party, love itself is in the air.  Claudio and Hero have experienced that glorious mystery: love at first sight.   But naturally, Claudio and Hero’s love must survive a misunderstanding:  at the Ball, Claudio jealously thinks Don Pedro was wooing Hero for himself.  But actually, Don Pedro had been wooing Hero for his friend, Claudio, trying to help him get the girl.  

 

In the meantime, another duo experiences sparks.  You see, Beatrice and Benedick had, at an earlier time, a romance.  Beatrice harbors some bitterness about it still, although she hides her hurt with her quick wit.  She has become a liberated lady who vows never to marry, and Benedict matches her as a liberated man who also vows not to marry. Their complex relationship is stirred to the boiling point at the costume Ball, a setting rife for mistaken identities – and for pretending not to know who someone is- if there ever was one.  

 

After the Ball, with Beatrice’s help, Claudio and Hero figure out the misunderstanding and with Leonatta, plan to get married the very next day.   But now enter the gloriously evil Don John, who doesn’t like all this happiness of the impending wedding.  

 

So as the party revelers go in from dancing to dinner, and as the night draws long and deepens, plots begin to be hatched in the cooling night air of the Courtyard.  With Borrachio’s and Conrade’s help, Don John seizes at a plot to confuse identities so that aspersions will be Hero’s purity to disrupt the whole thing.  

 

Barrachio will be with Margaret in Hero’s clothes. Don John will have Claudio and Pedro look up in the balcony and have see Hero, with another man, messing around.  

 

Yet another plot is hatched in the midsummer’s night air.  To humor himself while they are waiting for the wedding, Don Pedro devises a plan Beatrice and Benedict together.  He contrives a joke that will make Benedict think Beatrice loves him, and vice versa.  Don Pedro gets Leonatta and Claudio in on the act, and even the poor relations join in the fun.  Things are deliberately said when it is known that eavesdroppers are listening.  

 

Act II:  Act Two opens with an after-midnight scene that takes place in the Courtyard the same night of the Ball.  By now, the household has retired to bed.  The mansions’ pregnant night watchman, Dogberry, tells her security guards to keep an eye out for the safety of the sleeping guests.  The security guards overhear Boracchio and Conrade boasting about how successful their ruse was that fooled Claudio. The guards round up the troublemakers and ask Dogberry to interrogate them.  

 

The next afternoon, Hero and her companions prepare for the wedding that is to take place that night.  Margaret needles Hero about being married, while Beatrice, out of sorts, remains perplexed about what she’s overheard about Benedict’s love for her.  The household ponders love and marriage from their divergent viewpoints. 

 

As evening approaches, those involved in the wedding gather in the Courtyard for the ceremony.  But when the Friar routinely asks if there is any reason the wedding should not take place, Claudio suddenly reveals he is angry about Hero’s apparent infidelity.  Tensions mount as Don Pedro, who has also been fooled, even accuses Hero of being a “common stale” (whore).  When Claudio, Pedro and Don John (who is enjoying all this) storm out, the confused and hurt Hero is even set upon by her own mother, who has also believed the stories of Hero’s impurity.  

 

The Friar hatches a plot to save Hero: he suggests they all pretend Hero is dead, hoping the drama will shock Claudio into feeling remorse and reminding him how much he loved her.  While the household leaves to enact this plan, Benedict, touched by the emotion of the day, confesses to Beatrice that he loves her.  Through her own anguish about Hero’s fate, Beatrice confesses she loves him too.  When Benedict says he’ll do anything for her, Beatrice says she wants him to kill Claudio to revenge her cousin.  Benedict won’t go that far, but vows to confront him.  

 

Behind the scenes, Dogberry and a judge interrogates Borrachio and Conrade.  They learn that Don John paid them $1000 dollars to accuse Hero wrongfully.  The judge thinks that Don John, who escaped, died of remorse, so the evil-doers appear to have been dealt with.

 

Meanwhile, Leonatta and Don Antonio, very upset by the whole situation, encounter Claudio and Don Pedro, who are leaving to go home.  To avenge his niece, Don Antonio tries to engage them in a fight to no avail.  But Benedict arrives and challenges Claudio to a duel, although Claudio and Don Pedro rebuff his threats.  However, Night Watchperson Dogberry arrives and exposes all the plots.  Claudio, who now feels just awful, is asked by Leonatta to absolve Hero, who she still pretends is dead.  Leonatta demands that Claudio not only absolve her daughter, but marry another niece who looks exactly like Hero.  This way, Leonatta can see the wedding that should have been her daughter’s. 

 

The next day, a veiled woman in the wedding party is presented to Claudio for marriage, and Benedict and Beatrice are coaxed by the evidence of the love poems they had been writing into making it a double wedding.  Dogberry announces Don John has been captured, the household plans to deal with him tomorrow, and the household’s celebration is on.  

 

HISTORICAL NOTE:  Mexico experienced some rebellions during this era

 

 

 

ARTISTIC LEADERSHIP, CAST AND KEY CREW:

MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING (Salisbury House)

 

Artistic Director (Dramaturgy, Interpretation, infusion of multi-disciplinary elements): Lorenzo Sandoval, MFA

Play Adaptation: Lorenzo Sandoval, MFA

Director: Lorenzo Sandoval, MFA

Technical Director (Setting, Props, Costume Vision, Lighting Design, Set Transitions): Robin Heinemann

 

Producers:  Robin Heinemann and Lorenzo Sandoval, MFA

 

Choreographer: Karina Barone

Assistant Choreographer: Elizabeth Cameron

Musical Director:  Jon Benoit

Costumes: Mel Ziegenfuss and Abigail Livingood

Sound and Light Master: Jake Hines

 

 

CAST: 

 

John Bach (Claudio, One of the lovers, also returning from the skirmishes in Mexico, visiting with Don Pedro)

Mike Bany (Friar, Judge-Double cast roles of local authority)

Karina Barone (Mysterious Tango Dancer -A mysterious 1920s Tango Dancer who attends the party.  What more do ya want!)

Trey K. Blackburn (Borachio ,Don John’s henchman and comrade from the skirmishes)

Elizabeth Cameron,( Ursula, A poor relation of the household, who helps with household chores and is a companion to Hero)

Ruthellen Cunnally, (Leonata-Head of the household, owner of the Mansion where the story takes place, mother of Hero and Beatrice’s aunt)

A. Fogg (Night Vistor, a mysterious night visitor who adds much to the production)

Joe Leonardi ( Don John-Don Pedro’s inherently wicked brother)

Grey Lovelace (Conrade- Another of Don John’s henchmen and comrades from the skirmish, visiting the House)

David Oddy (Benedick, One of the lovers, who is returning from skirmishes in Mexico, visiting the House with Don Pedro)

Suzie Oddy (Dogberry The pregnant local constable – originally from Fargo, ND)

Rachel Salowitz ( Hero, One of the lovers, the daughter of Leonata)

Lorenzo Sandoval (Don Antonio- Brother of Leonata, uncle to Hero and Beatrice)

Benjamin Sheridan: (Bathazar A poor, very distant young relation, helping in the household)  

Kerrry Skram (Beatrice, One of the lovers, the niece of Leonata, living at Leonata’s home)

“T.T.” (Chauffer-  Has driven the visitors on their journey home from Mexico)

Dean Williams ( Seacole- An underling of Dogberry’s, a night watchman)

Jennifer Wood (( Margaret-Another poor relation, also a friend to Hero, sent to help in the household from her Southern home)

John Zickenfoose, (Don Pedro The Ambassador of Mexico, visiting old friends Leonatta and Antonio)

Band

Ballyhoo FoxTrot Orchestra  

Musical Director: Jon Benoit

Lead Singer: Kim Fitch

 

MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING  (Salisbury House)

DVD TABLE OF CONTENTS:  Locating and comprehending Tracts

 

 

 

 

CONTENT

DEMONSTRATES

DESCRIPTION  AND PLOT

MINUTES

(Approx.)

1

Pre-show

Music

Kim Fitch and the Ballyhoo Foxtrot Orchestra set the stage!

1 ½

 

2

Directors comments and setting the story

 

At the courtyard of Leonata’s home, various family members and friends are preparing for the 

arrival of guests who will be attending a masked Renaissance-themed ball. Leonata’s brother, 

Don Antonio, the playful and somewhat eccentric kindly uncle, enjoys his role as one of 

the party’s hosts.  

6

3

Car Approaches – the plot thickens

Production Values

Visitors to the house and the Ball start to arrive. 

2 ½

 

4

Don Juan- hisss, boo

Drama/Comedy mix

Caught humorously as he is in the middle of having to dress for the Renaissance Ball 

(disgusted that some find this fun!) the scene features speech by the famous evil-for-evil’s sake

 illain, who has no real reason to be mean, but it evil-to-the-core anyway

 – the only way he does have fun!

2

5

Party set up

Classic Scene

Preparing for the masked ball

2

6

The Masked Ball

Dance: Mix of professional dancer with Actor Non Dancers- specific and unique demand of theatre.  The Dance has 3 distinct parts

Scene also demonstrates a great technical challenge- when non-dancing Actors must engage in dialogue during movement.  

At the masked ball, various romantic plots and intrigues begin to unfurl as characters

 (sometimes knowingly and sometimes in the dark) interact with one another from 

behind masks which give them the freedom to say things they might otherwise not. 

 

Later, one of the guests enjoys a playful dance first with the other women – 

who quickly drop out as they don’t feel they can keep pace with this expert dancer.  

So the dancer humorously chooses Uncle Don Antonio as her next partner- 

much to the older man’s delight.  He- and she- both rise to the occasion –

 to the thrilled, surprised amusement of the rest of the party.  

But no one is more surprised than Don Antonio! 

(in 3 parts)

7

Claudio part 1

Classic scene

Claudio and Hero’s relationship

4

8

Claudio  part 2

Classic scene

Claudio is in love with Hero and wants to marry her

4

9

Benedict

Classic scene

Benedict muses on love and life

6

10

Beatrice 

Classic scene

Beatrice muses on love and life

2

11

During Intermission

Production Values

 

20 secs

12

Bringing the Audience back from Intermission

Production Values

 

40 secs

13

Act II opening

Production Values

 

3

14

The Servant’s Song

Music

Shakespeare explicitly writes a song into his play at this point in the action, 

as the “below stairs” folk engage in a little friendly entertainment.  

We update ours to the 1920’s period. 

3

15

Eavesdropping

Famous comedic scene – considered to be among Shakespeare’s most successful comic bits

In this classic scene, the crazy, “Lucy”-esque moments of Shakespeare come out. 

 As Hero takes in the night air before retiring to bed, Beatrice hides behind a tree to eavesdrop

 on Hero. Hero, fully aware Beatrice is there all along, plays a trick on her as she spins tales

 about Benedict, the object of Beatrice’s interest. 

6

16

Nightwatchman returns

Comedic relief, as Shakespeare designed this material to be

As the night before the wedding deepens, Nightwatchmen at Leonata’s home find mischief

 is afoot.  Not the most competent watchman in the world (easily blinded by each other’s

 flashlights) they call in Dogberry, Shakespeare’s deliberately course stock Constable figure, 

a large function of which in Shakespeare’s world was simple comic relief.  In our version, 

Dogberry is played as a pregnant constable from North Dakota- a foreshadowing 

of the way in which as part of the 1920s and women’s suffrage, women did begin to find more occupations open to them  

6

17

Hello Bluebird

SCENE CHANGE

Music

Leonata, (mother of bride to be Hero), and her brother prepare the family home 

for Hero’s upcoming wedding while the band practices for the big event.

1

18

Wedding Tableaux and Wedding, part of Mother’s 

Monologue

Use of music and drama

Following a musical tableau, presenting without words the ambivalence and worry of the major characters about the forthcoming wedding (as Hero playfully tosses her bouquet from the 

balcony in Beatrice’s direction), the scene transitions into the (first) wedding scene where 

Hero’s character is assassinated. Her own mother turns on her, but the mother’s grief 

for her daughter is also evident. 

8

19

Beatrice’s Famous Monologue
“Oh if I were a man”

Intense drama

Angry at how easily those of her sex can be undone by unfair, vicious rumors and innuendo, 

Beatrice flails out at the nature of relationships between men and women 

4

20

Fight 1 Uncle is Angry

Classic scene

Semi-comedically but with pathos, an indignantly enraged Uncle (Don Antonio), trying to 

avenge his niece, takes on much younger or bigger men, who back away in a mixture of horror,

 pathos and respect. 

40 secs

21

Fight 2 Uncle is Angry

Classic Scene

The uncle of disgraced bride-to-be Hero swears punishment on those who he perceives to

 have wronged his niece, while with pathos, the other gentlemen back away, not wanting to 

engage physically with the older, smaller man.

1

22

Love Part 1

Classic scene

Beatrice and Benedict truly are in love

1

23

Love Part 2 

Classic scene

Beatrice and Benedict 

40 secs

24

Love Part 3 and Conclusion of the Scene, begin the music

 

Beatrice and Benedict unite at a second mysterious wedding

3

25

Charleston Bergamask

Final Big Production Number

Production Values;

Choreography for Non-Dancers

Following the second wedding, the guests strike up their heels in an amusing Charleston, 

where once again playfulness is revealed as all try to keep pace with one another for the 

sheer joy of the evening!  Note that in Shakespeare’s time, almost all plays closed with a 

Bergamask (a dance), a tradition the ISE subscribes to. 

3

26

Finale 

 

 

1

 

 

WHEN LINK IS AVAILABLE, CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE SPECIFIC TRACTS LISTED ABOVE:    X

 

 

 

 

 

Vido Clips:

Other 

Heinemann Sandvoal Productions

 

At Terrace Hill:  

 

Five years of shows at Terrace Hill have included: 

  •  Ebeneezer and the Spirit of Giving
  •  The Age of Innocence
  •  Twain at Twilight

 

Video arriving as available

 

At the Des Moines Art Center:

 

A full Decade of original plays presented in association with Lorenzo’s role as founding Artistic Director for one of the Art Center’s largest events in its history: The Day of the Dead series.

 

Video and stills arriving as available

 

Across Iowa:

 

Video and Stills from a variety of traveling arts programs from all across the state and the Midwest will be posted as it arrives. 

 

Lorenzo Sandoval television shows in association with Iowa Public Television

 

Access Lorenzo’s tenure as On-Air Host and writer for the statewide, weekly public affairs program Insight Iowa at:

 

Access Lorenzo’s television work as On-Air Host of the Iowa World Food Prize and other television specials at:

 

 

 

Lorenzo Sandoval / Robin Heinemann television shows in association with City Spotlights and the City of Des Moines

 

Robin’s work with City Spotlights as a Producer and Executive Producer of this monthly city television show on the arts spans two Mayors, and Lorenzo came on board under Mayor Frank Cownie.

 

Video and stills arriving as available

 

Lorenzo Sandoval / Robin Heinemann: work with youth, in association with P’ARTners Unlimited, with many thanks to Kelly Boone.  

 

PROJECT: The “Backyard Bards” of Moulton Elementary perform

A Midsummer Night’s Dream: “The Mechanicals”

 

Video and stills arriving as available.